Kishbaugh Family History
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The information on this web page is not the latest information we have on this family. You're welcome to visit our web page, where our latest research papers on these families can be downloaded.

Our maternal grandfather was Paul Daniel Hines, and his maternal grandmother was Jane Margaret Kishbaugh, who married Daniel S. Thomas

We don’t factually know about the Kishbaugh family’s arrival in Colonial America, or who the Kishbaugh Colonial patriarch was, or of their origins.

What others have written about the Kishbaugh family is all we have, except for our line linked to Paul Lafayette Kishbaugh. It’s a shame that no one is properly documenting their work on this family. I personally want to know that someone did a "fact check", and not just replicated bad information.

The Kishbaugh Colonial patriarch presumably starts with Heinrich Wilhelm or Wilhelm Kishbaugh, who was a farmer in Knowlton Sussex County (now Warren County) New Jersey. He married Mary Henry.

From William Kishbaugh and Mary Henry, we follow a son named John Kishbaugh who was born about 1798 in Knowlton Sussex County (now Warren County) New Jersey. John married Elizabeth Arner and all of their children were born in Nescopeck Township, Luzerne County Pennsylvania.

i.    Rosanna Kishbaugh was born February 8th 1823. She never married, and she apparently suffered some brain damage from a childhood illness.

ii.   Ephraim Kishbaugh was born: June 12th 1824. He married Sarah Hart.

iii.  Maria Kishbaugh was christened on October 27th 1826 in Hazleton, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.

iv.   Paul Lafayette Kishbaugh  was born in 1829.

v.    Susan C. Kishbaugh was born about 1832.

vi.   Anson Kishbaugh was born about 1833.

vii.  Elizabeth Kishbaugh was born December 27th 1836.

viii.; Almeda Ellen Kishbaugh was born October 17th 1838.

ix.   William R. Kishbaugh was born May 4th 1841.

x.    Freeman Kishbaugh was born about 1844.

We’ll continue researching this family, and properly documenting their history.

Paul Lafayette Kishbaugh Family History

Our Kishbaugh Family History is incomplete, and here is our research paper on Paul Lafayette Kishbaugh (1829-1864) and his family.

What we know is that Paul Lafayette [1] Kishbaugh was born April 7th 1829. [2]  In 1850 Paul was living with his uncle, Casper Kishbaugh and his family, in Nescopeck Township Luzerne County Pennsylvania, while Mary Ann was living in Lausanne Township, Carbon County Pennsylvania with the Fry family.

Paul married Mary Ann Shaffer on May 7th 1853 in Weatherly, Carbon County Pennsylvania by the Justice of the Peace, James Lewis. [3] Mary Ann was born September 1833 in Pennsylvania.

By 1860 Paul and his family were living in East Maunch Chunk (present day Jim Thorpe), and he was a Locomotive Engineer. Living with the family was Susan Fry (b. 1846), and Mary Grady (b.1843). Susan Fry was also listed in the 1850 census where Mary was living with the Fry family. Together Paul and Mary Ann had five children. [4] 

i.     Martha Jane Kishbaugh was born August 16th 1853 to Paul Lafayette Kishbaugh and Mary Ann Shaffer. She went by the name Jane, and married Daniel S. Thomas of Luzerne County Pennsylvania. Jane died January 7th 1922, and was laid to rest in the Evergreen Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, Carbon County Pennsylvania. My mother, Jane Alice Hines-Taylor, is named after her.

ii.   Margaret (Maggie) Ann Kishbaugh was born about August 7th 1855, and was a school teacher in East Mauch Chuck in 1880. Margaret (Maggie) Kishbaugh went on to become a teacher out west, teaching at a school for Native Americans during the plains war period in America. Maggie once had a cottage on Lake Harmony in the Pocono Mountains, later locally known as a resort. [5] Lake Harmony is a reservoir, and the name of a village in Kidder Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania.

iii.  Edward Kishbaugh was born November 25th 1857. He and his brother Wilson were admitted to the Solders Orphan School, Martha Bennet Children’s Home in Luzerne County on April 19th 1866. Edward died May 14th 1866 of congestion of the brain. [6] 

iv.   Wilson Kishbaugh was born August 4th 1859. He and his brother Edward were admitted to the Solders Orphan School, Martha Bennet Children’s Home in Luzerne County on April 19th 1866. [7]  He married about 1885 to Emma L. Buchman. Emma was born September 1859 in Pennsylvania to Henry Buchman and Angelina Wolfe, who were both born in Pennsylvania. Wilson and Emma lived in Philadelphia County Pennsylvania. Emma died while in Philadelphia Pennsylvania at 55 years, 7 months, and 29 days on April 9th 1915. She was laid to rest April 10th 1915 in Mauch Chuck Pennsylvania. [8] Wilson moved to Miami Florida, where he died on Thursday 1949 at 90 years old. [9] 

v.    Paul James Kishbaugh was born January 20th 1864, and was christened on March 29th 1865, sponsored by Margaretha Arner. [10] Paul was clerk, and later a sales agent for a coal company. He married Emilie C. about 1887-88 who was born in Pennsylvania about July 1864.

As the Civil War continued over the next four years, the Union forces were in constant need of new recruits. During one of these recruitment drives, on February 25th 1864, Paul Kishbaugh enrolled in the Union forces. On March 2nd 1864 he mustered-in as a private within Company G, under the command of John Patton of the 81st Pennsylvania Regiment (Volunteers).

On February 6th and 7th of 1864, at the time of Paul’s enrollment, the 81st regiment was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, II Corp, First Division under the command of Brigadier general Francis C. Barlow, and the 1st Brigade under the command of Colonel Nelson A. Miles.

The regiment was engaged in Spotsylvania County Virginia, in what is known as the Demonstration on the Rapidan, or the Battle of Morton’s Ford, about 5 miles south Stevensburg Virginia. The Union forces were attempting to distract the confederate forces’ attention from a planned Union cavalry-infantry raid up the Peninsula on Richmond Virginia. To do this the Union army forced several crossings of the Rapidan River.

Beginning on February 6th 1864 the II Corps division, including the 81st Pennsylvania regiment, crossed at Morton’s Ford, while the I Corps crossed at Raccoon Ford. Union cavalry crossed at Robertson’s Ford. Ewell’s Corps resisted the crossings. Fighting was sporadic but most severe at Morton’s Ford. By February 7th the attacks had stalled, and the Federals withdrew during the night.

As Paul mustered-in the 81st Regiment on March 2nd 1864, the regiment was in Stevensburg Virginia. The following two months the 81st were consumed by reorganization. Change was in the air as the troops of the 81st shined their brass in preparation for the new spring campaign; little did the 81st know they would soon go through the bloodiest 30 days of the war. [11]

As Paul arrived in Stevensburg to join his regiment, they were preparing for the Rapidan Campaign, which lasted from May 4th to June 12th 1864. The campaign included...May 4th to the 7th where the Battles of the Wilderness; May 8th to the 12th was Corbin’s Bridge and Spotsylvania, Po River, Assault on the Salient, and Spotsylvania Court House.

The following area accounts of Paul Kishbaugh’s last days with the 81st.

•    "...That he was a member of the 81st Regt Penn Vols and was well acquainted with Paul Kishbaugh before his enlistment...and in the line of duty during the battle of the Wilderness between the 5th and 12th of May said Kishbaugh became very ill from chronic diarrhea and was taken to the Field Hospital afterwards removed to the rear for the purpose to be sent to some general Hospital. That after the Battle of Coal Harbor sometime in May this Respondent was a solder and member of the same corps and one of the ambulance drivers with whom he had some slight acquaintance but whose name he has forgotten who informed me that he had buried a man by the name of Paul Kishbauch. That he knew his name from the fact of it having been printed on his arm in...that Kishbauch had died while being conveyed in ambulance between Wilderness and Port Royal and was buried about four miles from Port Royal...” [12]

•    "...declares that he was late Captain of Co “I” of the 81st Regiment Penns Vols, and was well acquainted with Paul Kishbaugh a private of Co “G”, afterwards “I” of said regiment...has personal knowledge the fact that the said Paul sometime during the first part of may...contracted the chronic diarrhea by reason of which he was removed to Field Hospital...and has every reason to believe died while in an ambulance train between the Wilderness and Port Royal in May 1864...” [13]

Paul was never in any other Company, but Company “G” of the 81st regiment. The field hospital was located at Camp California, [14] and Paul died June 16th 1864 [15] near Hanover Virginia,; [16] while being transported on an ambulance train from the Wilderness of Spotsylvania to Port Royal Caroline County Virginia. But where he was laid to rest is still unclear.

The civil war pension affidavit by Charles Hontz said Paul was buried four miles from Port Royal, presumable coming from the Wilderness. Then there’s the headstone of Paul and Mary Kishbaugh at the Union Cemetery, Weatherly Carbon County, Pennsylvania. This is another interesting part of the research, where does Paul lay at rest? Also in the Charles Hontz affidavit, it was mentioned that there was a portrait of Paul Kishbaugh. It would be nice to find that piece of photo history.

After Paul’s death, Martha and Maggie went to live at the Solders Orphans’ School in Quakertown, Bucks County Pennsylvania. Edward died May 14th of congestion of the brain. [16] Mary Ann, and two of her sons, Wilson and Paul James, was living together in Weatherly Carbon County. Weatherly is the place where Paul Kishbaugh and Mary Ann Shaffer married, and most likely where other family members still live. It is about 12 miles north of Mauch Chuck, which is called Jim Thorpe today.

By 1870 Mary Ann Kishbaugh and her children, Jane, Maggie and Wilson, were residents in the civil war children’ss orphanage for veterans (Solders Orphans’ School) in Chester Springs West Pikeland Township Chester County Pennsylvania. Mary was a house keeper, while her children were teachers (scholars) at the Solders Orphanage School.

The 1880 census record shows Mary age 46, widowed, living with her daughter Maggie age 24, a school teacher, and Wilson age 20, a carpenter in East Mauch Chuck.

Mary Ann Shaffer-Kishbaugh died in December 31st 1903, [19] and she was laid to rest, presumably next to Paul, in section lot 248 of the Union Cemetery, Weatherly Carbon County, Pennsylvania. The headstone for Paul and Mary is difficult to read, so we did a digital enhancement. It appears the headstone reads Paul 1829-1864, and Mary A. 1833-1883.

End Notes

[1.] We are still researching to verify his middle name, Lafayette. In Paul’ss Widow Pension File, in a Department of Interior Pension record, indicated Paul’s middle initial was “A”.

[2.] Paul’s month and day for his 1829 birth is still being verified.

[3.] Paul Kishbaugh, Civil War Pension Application File #106847, August 23rd 1865, Pension Certificate #115027, Form 85D, The National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[4.] Paul Kishbaugh, Civil War Pension Application File #106847, August 23rd 1865, Pension Certificate #115027, Form 85D, The National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[5.] This information on Maggie came from hand written notes by Maggie’s sister, Martha Jane’s grandson, Paul Daniel Hines. Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[6.] Pages 428-430, Pennsylvania’ss Soldier’ss Orphan Schools, by James Laughery Paul, 1877

[7.] Pages 428-430, Pennsylvania’ss Soldier’ss Orphan Schools, by James Laughery Paul, 1877

[8.] Emma L. Kishbaugh Death Certificate Index: FHL Film Number: 1429086, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Death Certificates, 1803-1915. Index. Family Search, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2008, 2010. From originals housed at the Philadelphia City Archives. Death Records.

[9.] Wilson Thomas Obituary, Allentown Morning Call Newspaper, 1949, Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[10.] Church Book 2, Mt. Zion Birth and Baptism Records, Nescopeck Township Luzerne County Pennsylvania

[11.] History of the 81st P.V.I., "The Fighting Chippewas", The Story of the 81st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the American Civil War, By Robert Mischak, Ryan Lindbuchler, and Walter Boyle. http://www.angelfire.com/pa3/81stpennsylvania/original.html

[12.] From the Paul Kishbaugh Civil War pension Application File #106847, an affidavit made by Charles Hontz, a resident of Mauch Chunk attached to Company G, the 81st Pennsylvania Regiment (Volunteers), September 4th 1867. Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[13.] From the Paul Kishbaugh Civil War pension Application File #106847, an affidavit made by Charles Hontz, a resident of Mauch Chunk attached to Company G, the 81st Pennsylvania Regiment (Volunteers), September 4th 1867. Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[14.] The reference to Camp California came from an affidavit from Libor Winter, Lieutenant of Company G, 81st Pennsylvania regiment (Volunteers), January 31st 1867, in Paul’s Widow Pension Records. The location of Camp California is still being researched.

[15.] Paul’s death is correct as written from his Civil War Widow Pension Record, but there is an error in his recorded death from his burial card; which reported his death as February 1864, and his GAR Headstone Marker Civil War information was provided by William Williams on February 1st 1931 on a veteran burial notification card.

[16.] Paul Kishbaugh, Civil War Pension Application File #106847, August 23rd 1865, Pension Certificate #115027, Form 85D, The National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740-6001, Taylor ~ Graham Library, 479 County Line Road, York Springs, PA 17372

[17.] Pages 428-430, Pennsylvania’s Soldier’s Orphan Schools" by James Laughery Paul, 1877

[18.] Chester Springs is just 70 miles south of East Mauch Chunk PA, and 40 miles from Philadelphia PA.

[19.] Mary Ann Kishbaugh’s date of death came from Paul’s Civil War Widow Pension Record, where the date of her pension was stopped. This may or may not be her actual date of death.

Bibliography

1. 1850 Mary Shaffer Census: Lausanne, Carbon, Pennsylvania; Roll: M432_762; Page: 227B; Image: 21. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

2. 1850 John Kishbaugh Census: Nescopeck, Luzerne, Pennsylvania; Roll: M432_794; Page: 57B; Image: 403. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

3. 1850 Casper Kishbaugh Census: Nescopeck, Luzerne, Pennsylvania; Roll: M432_794; Page: 61A; Image: 410. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

4. 1850 Jacob and Mother Mary Kishbaugh Census: Nescopeck, Luzerne, Pennsylvania; Roll: M432_794; Page: 57B; Image: 403. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, 1009 rolls); Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

5. 1860 Paul Kishbaugh Census: East Mauch Chunk, Carbon, Pennsylvania; Roll: M653_1089; Page: 811; Image: 76; Family History Library Film: 805089. 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

6. John Kishbaugh Draft Registration: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registration Records (Provost Marshal General’s Bureau; Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865); Record Group: 110, Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War); Collection Name: Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865 (Civil War Union Draft Records); ARC Identifier: 4213514; Archive Volume Number: 1 of 3.

7. Paul Kischbach Civil War Pension Index Card: National Archives and Records Administration. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288, 546 rolls.

8. Paul Kishbaugh Veterans Burial Card: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania Veterans Burial Cards, 1929-1990; Archive Collection Number: Series 1-6; Folder Number: 252.

9. Pages 1167-2001, 81st Regiment, History of Pennsylvania volunteers, 1861-5; prepared in compliance with acts of the legislature, by Samuel P. Bates. Author: Bates, Samuel P. (Samuel Penniman), 1827-1902.

10. Patriotism of Carbon County, Pa. and what her people contributed during the war for the preservation of the Union by J.D. Laciar. Published 1867 by [s.n.] in Mauch Chunk, Pa.

11. 1870 Mary Kisbaugh Census: West Pikeland, Chester, Pennsylvania; Roll: M593_1325; Page: 269A; Image: 550; Family History Library Film: 552824. 1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.

12. 1880 Mary Kishbach Census: East Mauch Chunk, Carbon, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1108; Family History Film: 1255108; Page: 533D; Enumeration District: 125; Image: 0721. Tenth Census of the United States, 1880. (NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.